Oslo Wrap Up

I adore Oslo. It’s one of my favorite European cities and one that I’ve never gotten tired of.

  1. DO NOT TAKE A TAXI. Taxis in Oslo charge a minimum 200 NOK (24.80 USD) fare. You should absolutely take advantage of the public transportation system, especially since it works pretty well. The apps to use are RuterBillett (to buy tickets) and RuterReise/Google Maps (to plan out a trip and navigate the system). Note: you don’t actually have to validate your transportation tickets (and you can freely walk through the barriers in the subway system), but they do randomly check to make sure that you have tickets. The fines are very steep if you’re caught without a ticket (~150 USD) so just keep that in mind if you decide not to buy one.
  2. In order to get to the city from the airport you’ll either take the flytoget (airport train) or the flybussen (airport bus). The train is much faster, but depending on where you’re staying the bus might drop you off closer to your accommodations.
  3. The city’s main street is Karl Johans Gate and quite a few major sites are near it as is a ton of shopping.
  4. The Oslo Opera House is quite possibly my favorite site in Oslo. It’s a stunning piece of architecture and you’re free to walk in it, on it, and around it. The view from the roof also isn’t half bad. I would highly recommend either doing a tour of the opera house or going to see a performance there. The opera is required to sell 100 tickets at 100 NOK (~16 USD) for every performance so it’s pretty easy to get affordable tickets and good seats.
  5. Absolutely go to Vigeland Park (which is in Frogner Park). The park is a ways away from the city center so I would recommend taking the tram or subway, but the sculptures are great and it’s nice to just walk around.
  6. Definitely pay a stop to Bygdøy peninsula. Depending on the time of year, you can reach it by either bus or by ferry. If the ferry is running I would recommend taking it, even if it’s just to get a view of the city from the water. Here’s what you can see there:
    • Viking Ship Museum – It has three different viking ship relics + a few other Viking things. It’s kinda cool to go and see but there isn’t actually much to do at the museum
    • Folkemusem – Great if you want an overview of Norwegian history and culture. It also has 24 acres of land with 160 different kinds of historic buildings. If you’re dying to see a stave church and won’t make it out of the city then definitely stop by.
    • Fram Museum – Unfortunately I haven’t spent enough time here. What I did see what great, especially if you’re interested in Arctic exploration and/or ships (plus all of the other major ship museums are literally next door).
  7. The Nobel Peace Center – Does a pretty good job of talking about the Nobel Peace Prize and the latest winners. I would recommend going if you want to learn more about the prize.
  8. Nasjonalmuseet (The National Museum) – A pretty good museum and the location of Munch’s famous The Scream. It’s small though so it’s pretty manageable to do in about an hour or two.
  9. City Hall – If you can manage to go to the room where they give out the Nobel Peace Prize you should since it’s stunning. I’m pretty sure that they organize tours.
  10. Ekeberg Park – Go if you want a good view of the city (but if it’s a cloudy or foggy day maybe give it a pass). It’s an interesting place since it also has a ton of famous artwork scattered throughout the park (Rodin, Salvador Dali, etc.). Walking down from the park to the city will also give you the same backdrop that is painted in The Scream.
  11. Holmenkollen – Go if you want to see the famous ski jump, walk around the forest, and get a good view of the city. I’ve heard that the museum is also pretty good and has a ski jump simulator.
  12. Vigeland Museum/Mausoleum – There are actually two Vigeland sculptors, and this is a “museum” done by the less famous brother. It’s a bit outside of the city center, but if you have the time to check it out it’s pretty neat.
  13. If you want to see some nice graffiti/street art go check out the area around Mathallen (food hall).
  14. If you are there in winter, you absolutely have to check out Korktrekkeren, a large sledding area that will take you about 15 minutes to go down. It’s fantastic. For the best sledding go early on a weekday.

Svalbard Wrap Up

I have to say that Sarah officially wins the most badass Fulbrighter award. While I really enjoyed my visit to Svalbard, I couldn’t imagine living there for more than a few months, much less the two years that Sarah intends on living there for. That being said, Longyearbyen is located in a truly beautiful area and I’m happy that I made time for the trip. Here are my tips and tricks:

  1. Bring your passport with you to Svalbard, even if you are taking a domestic flight from Norway.
  2. Svalbard is not a budget location and I wouldn’t consider it a place that people should visit in a flight of fancy. Svalbard is a very dangerous place, even though those dangers are atypical.* Be aware that Lonyearbyen is little more than a one street town and that leaving town requires going with someone who is quite knowledgeable about the area and the risks. This pretty much means that you can only leave town if you book a tour (which tends to be expensive) or if you happen to know someone who can show you around.
  3. If you are going in winter definitely keep an eye on the sort of daylight that you will be encountering. I was lucky that my trip coincided with twilight, meaning that I didn’t need a headlamp when I went hiking.
  4. Keep an eye on the weather and pack accordingly. Keep in mind that Svalbard can be VERY windy so bring a few things that are windproof.
  5. Public transportation doesn’t exist in Longyearbyen so your only options are walking or a taxi.
  6. I would highly recommend exploring the area around Longyearbyen since it’s beautiful. I would also recommend the Svalbard Gallery, Svalbard Museum, and polar bear sign.
  7. Many places will have an area for you to store your coat and boots during the winter. If you have space in your bag, I would recommend bringing a pair of slippers that you can wear whenever you are indoors.
  8. If you go in winter and go outdoors I would recommend bringing hiking boots and some sort of waterproof pants/ski pants that are designed to help keep the snow out of your shoes

*In terms of typical crime Svalbard is very safe. Most people leave their cars unlocked and keep car keys and snowmobile keys in the ignition. Apparently the crime of the decade occurred when someone had their photography equipment stolen out of their unlocked car, but that was highly unusual and something that the community found really shocking (it was also assumed that the perpetrator was a tourist as opposed to a resident). I found I had no problem leaving my very expensive camera at a table when I went to the front of a coffee shop to order something, and lost items are easily returned to their owners on the island.

Gjelder Hele Svalbard

My last day in Svalbard was really only a half day. My flight left in the afternoon so there wasn’t too much time to do anything; however, one thing that I did want to do before I left was to go to Svalbard’s famous polar bear sign. The sign itself lies on the outskirts of town so it required a bit of a walk. Although I wasn’t overjoyed to step outside of the university’s warm halls and into the bitter cold, things looked up when we serendipitously we saw a reindeer along the way.

IMG_8812  IMG_8886  IMG_8887The reindeer in Svalbard are slightly different from the reindeer on the mainland. The first thing that I noticed is that they are much shorter than mainland reindeer, and they also have thicker winter coats. Additionally, unlike other reindeer, I’ve been told that they tend to live alone or in groups of 2-6. Reindeer can still graze on Svalbard during winter, as this one was doing, but it’s much more difficult for them to find food in the midst of all of the ice. Because the winter conditions are so tough, Svalbard reindeer put on about 10 kg (22 lb) of fat during the summer in order to keep warm in winter. On the plus side, the reindeer don’t have any predators on Svalbard so their greatest risk of death is through starvation.

IMG_8819  IMG_8827  IMG_8829IMG_8837  IMG_8844  IMG_8850After snapping a few pictures, we continued on our way to the sign. It was about a twenty minute walk away from the university, but before too long we reached the sign. The only problem? Just as we completed our walk, a taxi full of tourists stopped right in front of us. This means that we had to wait for eight or so tourists to take their pictures before we could finally go and take our own. Apparently you can take taxi tours of Svalbard, and considering the prices of the more expensive tours, the taxi tours seem quite cheap.

For those of you wondering what “Gjelder hele Svalbard” means I’ve been told that it translates to “Valid for all of Svalbard.” In other words, you should watch out for polar bears throughout the islands.

IMG_8864  IMG_8865  IMG_8883After that all that was really left to do was to buy a few more souvenirs (I bought a Svalbard hat that is apparently 30% possum—who knew that possum was a clothing material?) before heading to the airport.

The airport itself was pretty cosy. It’s so small that there aren’t even gates, though I suppose you could make the argument that the airport technically contains two gates—they just aren’t numbered. I caught my flight out of Svalbard without a too much of a hassle and eventually made my way back to Trondheim. I have to admit that compared to Longyearbyen Trondheim seems like a major metropolitan area. While I’m incredibly grateful to Sarah for hosting me, I’m definitely glad to be snuggled back in Trondheim and to have the (limited) sun for company.

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