Oslo Wrap Up

I adore Oslo. It’s one of my favorite European cities and one that I’ve never gotten tired of.

  1. DO NOT TAKE A TAXI. Taxis in Oslo charge a minimum 200 NOK (24.80 USD) fare. You should absolutely take advantage of the public transportation system, especially since it works pretty well. The apps to use are RuterBillett (to buy tickets) and RuterReise/Google Maps (to plan out a trip and navigate the system). Note: you don’t actually have to validate your transportation tickets (and you can freely walk through the barriers in the subway system), but they do randomly check to make sure that you have tickets. The fines are very steep if you’re caught without a ticket (~150 USD) so just keep that in mind if you decide not to buy one.
  2. In order to get to the city from the airport you’ll either take the flytoget (airport train) or the flybussen (airport bus). The train is much faster, but depending on where you’re staying the bus might drop you off closer to your accommodations.
  3. The city’s main street is Karl Johans Gate and quite a few major sites are near it as is a ton of shopping.
  4. The Oslo Opera House is quite possibly my favorite site in Oslo. It’s a stunning piece of architecture and you’re free to walk in it, on it, and around it. The view from the roof also isn’t half bad. I would highly recommend either doing a tour of the opera house or going to see a performance there. The opera is required to sell 100 tickets at 100 NOK (~16 USD) for every performance so it’s pretty easy to get affordable tickets and good seats.
  5. Absolutely go to Vigeland Park (which is in Frogner Park). The park is a ways away from the city center so I would recommend taking the tram or subway, but the sculptures are great and it’s nice to just walk around.
  6. Definitely pay a stop to Bygdøy peninsula. Depending on the time of year, you can reach it by either bus or by ferry. If the ferry is running I would recommend taking it, even if it’s just to get a view of the city from the water. Here’s what you can see there:
    • Viking Ship Museum – It has three different viking ship relics + a few other Viking things. It’s kinda cool to go and see but there isn’t actually much to do at the museum
    • Folkemusem – Great if you want an overview of Norwegian history and culture. It also has 24 acres of land with 160 different kinds of historic buildings. If you’re dying to see a stave church and won’t make it out of the city then definitely stop by.
    • Fram Museum – Unfortunately I haven’t spent enough time here. What I did see what great, especially if you’re interested in Arctic exploration and/or ships (plus all of the other major ship museums are literally next door).
  7. The Nobel Peace Center – Does a pretty good job of talking about the Nobel Peace Prize and the latest winners. I would recommend going if you want to learn more about the prize.
  8. Nasjonalmuseet (The National Museum) – A pretty good museum and the location of Munch’s famous The Scream. It’s small though so it’s pretty manageable to do in about an hour or two.
  9. City Hall – If you can manage to go to the room where they give out the Nobel Peace Prize you should since it’s stunning. I’m pretty sure that they organize tours.
  10. Ekeberg Park – Go if you want a good view of the city (but if it’s a cloudy or foggy day maybe give it a pass). It’s an interesting place since it also has a ton of famous artwork scattered throughout the park (Rodin, Salvador Dali, etc.). Walking down from the park to the city will also give you the same backdrop that is painted in The Scream.
  11. Holmenkollen – Go if you want to see the famous ski jump, walk around the forest, and get a good view of the city. I’ve heard that the museum is also pretty good and has a ski jump simulator.
  12. Vigeland Museum/Mausoleum – There are actually two Vigeland sculptors, and this is a “museum” done by the less famous brother. It’s a bit outside of the city center, but if you have the time to check it out it’s pretty neat.
  13. If you want to see some nice graffiti/street art go check out the area around Mathallen (food hall).
  14. If you are there in winter, you absolutely have to check out Korktrekkeren, a large sledding area that will take you about 15 minutes to go down. It’s fantastic. For the best sledding go early on a weekday.

Oslo Continued

One of the things that I really wanted to see in Oslo was their famed Opera House. I must admit that I’m not the biggest fan of opera. Don’t get me wrong, I have tried opera several times but unfortunately each time I just get frustrated with the fact that I can’t understand what people are singing, even when they are singing in English. So why did I want to visit the Opera House? I wanted to see it because it’s beautiful. The Opera House was opened to the public in 2008 and its architects intended for it to look like a glacier floating on water.

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I decided early on that I wanted to take a tour of the building and overall it was fascinating to walk through all of the elements of the Opera house and learn more about what goes on inside. The Opera House has 5 different stages which it can use, and it can even conduct outdoor concerts (you can climb up and down the roof so for an outdoor concert they simply line the roof with chairs). The Opera House is the home to both the Norwegian National Opera and Ballet, and on average if you include all of the work that goes into making the costumes, props, as well as rehearsals for the dancers and singers, a production takes two years to complete. Unfortunately there weren’t any shows on at the Opera House when we visited, but we still got to sit in the main concert hall. One thing that Norwegians are particularly well known for is their commitment to equality, and this really manifests itself in the design of the concert hall. We were told that no matter where you sit in the concert hall the sound should be exactly the same. In addition, the Opera House is intended to be accessible for all people (which makes sense considering the number of tax dollars that went into building it) thus it’s a requirement that for every show there must be 100 tickets available priced at 100 kroner (~16 USD).

After our tour of the opera we went to the Nobel Peace Center. The Nobel Peace Center is not where the actual peace prize is awarded, but is a museum about the Nobel Peace Prize and its winners. When we went the first floor was dedicated to social media and it’s impact on democracy. The main focus was on whether social media encourages productive debates through freedom of speech or whether it hinders debate because there are simply too many voices involved. Some fun facts that I got out of the exhibit are that 41% of the world’s population has access to internet but a staggering 1 in 5 people has a social media account. There was also a section on surveillance and whether or not it is a threat to democracy. Yes, there was even a piece on the NSA and Edward Snowden.

While the first floor was fun, I think that by far the most impactful part of the Nobel Peace Center was its segment on the 2013 Nobel Peace Prize winner, the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW). The OPCW has helped destroy 80 percent of the world’s chemical weapons and has recently come into the spotlight for the work it is doing to destroy Syria’s stockpile of chemical weapons. One really happy fact from this exhibit is that when organizations such at the OPCW go to destroy a country’s supply of chemical weapons the host country usually turns over all of their chemical weapons. If chemical weapons are missed it is often because a a small reserve has been forgotten, not because the country was being deliberately negligent.

While it’s very easy to associate chemical weapons with Syria, the OPCW works in many countries and still has a lot of work to do even in Europe. World War I has left its mark on Europe in many ways, one of which is the ‘iron harvest’ or undetonated mines and shells in Flanders. Belgium unearths as much as 100 tons of munitions a year, which is a fact that I personally find both incredible and frightening. Overall I left the exhibit with a very healthy respect for the work that the OPCW does around the world.

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