The House in the Woods

It’s been a while since I’ve gone on a cabin trip so I was excited to be invited on one this past weekend. Because TEDx Trondheim isn’t hosting any more events for 2014, the group decided that it’s be a good idea to get some bonding in and talk a bit about plans for 2015. The founder of TEDx Trondheim, Martin, happens to have a cabin in Gjevilvassdalen and graciously offered to let us spend the weekend there.

There were thirteen of us who were able to go on the cabin trip and Friday afternoon we all piled into two cars and headed to Gjevilvassdalen. Considering that my last cabin trip had an old fashioned wood burning stove, no electricity, no running water, and an outhouse, I was originally prepared to rough it. So I was a bit shocked when I was told to bring toiletries like shampoo with me on the trip. Yes, there was a shower at the cabin, there was running water, electricity, a refrigerator, and even a dishwasher. Even Martin admitted that it wasn’t a cabin in the woods–it was a house.

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We spent that first evening more or less relaxing and playing games. After dinner we played a get to know you game where we all wrote down a fact about ourselves, shuffled the facts around, and then voted on who we thought each fact belonged to. Shockingly enough, most people believed I had dreamed of being a professional athlete. I dislike most forms of physical activity but I guess I come across as athletic. The other fact people thought belonged to me involved playing bongo drums for a band that makes stoner rock music. I guess I shouldn’t have talked about Venice Beach earlier in the evening. In case you’re curious, the fact that I did submit was that I have ridden an elephant. Only one person out of the thirteen guessed that it was me so I felt pretty successful.

The next day was a day mostly dedicated to hiking. Martin has a five year old son and he told us that the path we were taking was one that even his son was capable of. So, with this extra bit of motivation we all set off. Within ten minutes of leaving the house we encountered reindeer! A whole herd of them calmly crossed the road in front of us. For our part, the only people who remained calm in our group were the Norwegians and the Swede. The rest of us were shutterbug happy.

IMG_5955  IMG_5961  IMG_5966Once we had finished taking pictures of the reindeer, we continued on our hike. The hike wasn’t too strenuous, but it was incredibly windy. Because of the weather we didn’t spend too much time at the top of the mountain, but the views we got at the peak made everything worthwhile.

IMG_5970  IMG_5979  IMG_6019After the hike, we warmed ourselves up in the house and started to discuss the organization of TEDx Trondheim. The objective of this was for the group to determine how TEDx Trondheim should be structured in the future. It was a long three hours, but by the end of it I think most people were satisfied. Or at least just happy to finally eat dinner.

We spent the rest of the night lounging around the cabin until Martin convinced most of us to play Cranium and Cards Against Humanity. I decided to sit out both games in favor of reading a book, but as the only native English speaker I was occasionally called upon to help with both games.

Our last day at the house was very relaxed. There happens to be a beach in Gjevilvassdalen so we took the cars and drove down to it. Considering that the weather wasn’t exactly what I would call warm, we spent most of our time just walking around the beach and exploring.

IMG_6052  IMG_6118  IMG_6145After that it was just a matter of heading back to the house, cleaning up, and then hitting the road. I would say that the trip was definitely a success and I came out with it with some nice memories and closer friendships.

The Charmed Cabin Trip

One of the great advantages to having a roommate who has lived in Norway for a year is that he knows just about everyone. This week it meant that I had the chance to go on a cabin trip that one of his friends had organized in Vekvessætra. Because the cabin was large enough to house 20 people, two cabin groups ended up merging to form what was ultimately a group of 24 people (don’t worry we didn’t wreck the cabin, some people slept outside in tents). The cabin was really quaint and even came with a traditional wood burning stove and an outhouse.

Because we arrived at the cabin in the late afternoon we didn’t actually get to do too much hiking. The hiking that we did do involved trying to find a lake…and instead finding a swamp. Two of the boys ended up trekking through the swamp until they found the mythical lake, but the rest of us turned back after getting thoroughly muddy and getting our feet soaked. The real highlight of the evening was getting to see the Northern Lights! Of course I didn’t bring my camera since I thought that nothing exciting would happen on our trip and the Northern Lights typically appear in winter. That was clearly the wrong packing choice. Sadly my iPhone wasn’t able to capture the Northern Lights because they were pretty faint.

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Anyways, there are a few important things to know about cabins and hiking in Norway: both things are a huge part of Norwegian culture, and it’s traditional for Norwegians to go on hikes on Sundays. There is also a pretty extensive cabin system throughout Norway, and you can rent a cabin from the Norwegian Trekking Association (DNT) for fairly cheap. Things get even better because once you are actually in the wilderness you can drink straight from streams and eat any of the wild berries. My group personally liked gorging on the wild blueberries.

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While our second day at the cabin did include slogging through a few more swampy areas we also got to see reindeer! They popped up out of nowhere and proceeded to calmly run around the mountain (and I admit they were doing a much better job than we were). We almost reached the summit of the mountain but decided to turn back at the last minute due to the weather. We ended up taking a slightly different route back from our original one, the result being that we got lost for two hours. While we had brought a map with us, it ended up being fairly useless since it didn’t have any features on it other than mountain contour lines. Our struggle to navigate back to the main road included wandering on a narrow ledge between a river and an enclosed pasture, talking to an elderly Norwegian man who couldn’t speak English, and asking for directions from a family that was quite literally gold mining in the river. Luckily we managed to find a cabin that had a road leading back to the main road. I don’t think I’ve ever been so excited to see pavement in my life.

IMG_0702   IMG_0717 All in all it was a truly charmed trip since I got to see both the Northern Lights and wild animals. I’m already looking forward to the next one!