Berlin via Oslo

Yes, yet another adventure, but this time it was for more official purposes. I was off to the German Fulbright Seminar. The Fulbright Program has an office in most European countries, but the biggest of them all is the German program (keep in mind that Senator Fulbright drafted the legislation for the Fulbright program in 1945–shortly after the end of World War II). This year’s German commission has approximately 60 researchers and 140 English Teaching Assistants (ETAs). Considering that in Norway we only have 3 ETAs, 3 Roving Scholars, and approximately 20 researchers, you really begin to see how much larger the German commission is when compared to other countries. Like the Norwegian Fulbright Commission, the German one has their own midyear seminar, although they have graciously opened it up to other Fulbrighters. So instead of having a more intimate seminar like we did in Norway, it is more of a unifying Fulbright conference. It was very kumbaya.

For now though, I’m not going to focus on the conference and will instead focus on how I got there. I bought my tickets very early on in the year so it was actually much cheaper for me to fly out of Oslo than to fly out of Trondheim. This meant that I had to take the train down to Oslo. Thankfully it was not all hustle and bustle to try and catch my eventual flight. I did have some free time in Oslo and was able to finally make my way out to Holmenkollen, the site of Oslo’s famous ski jump. To make things even better, it also happened to be Ski Festival in Oslo, which meant that I actually got to see people ski jumping.

IMG_9936  IMG_9940  IMG_9937IMG_9952  IMG_9948  IMG_9957IMG_9991  IMG_9960  IMG_0028Now I’ve always thought ski jumpers were a little bit crazy. Just think about it, who willingly throws themselves off of a manmade mountain on skis. Crazy people. But, like most humans, I find crazy people a little fascinating, and I can’t resist watching the ski jumpers for a least a few minutes during the winter Olympics. Little did I know how different it would be to watch ski jumpers live.

The cameras always manage to make the landing look like a fairly gentle incline. I’m here to tell you that the incline that they land on is a minimum of a black diamond ski slope, if not a double black diamond. And yes they are landing on it at a significant speed. There is absolutely no way that these people are sane. Of course this made everything that much more fascinating to watch.

One great thing about the Holmenkollen is the way that the stands are designed. You can sit at just about any part of the jump, and I even managed to climb up to the highest part of the stands, where the skiers stop gaining air and start making their descent. As someone who is scared of heights, I found this terrifying. But I did get some good pictures! All those years of taking sports pictures for my high school yearbook paid off.

IMG_0055  IMG_0085  IMG_0093IMG_0113  IMG_0114  IMG_0115It was also fun seeing what Norwegians are like as sports spectators. There weren’t too many Norwegians in the stands when I was there, but they were incredibly polite and they even cheered on and encouraged their rivals (though they obviously cheered loudest for their own athletes).

Once I was finished watching I decided to walk around the surrounding area. Unfortunately large parts of the forest were closed off to preserve the cross country courses, but what I did see was still lovely.

IMG_0031  IMG_0041  IMG_0037

One thought on “Berlin via Oslo

  1. Pingback: Oslo Wrap Up | Wayward Travels

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