Røros

Fall is officially here! While I am not a huge fan of winter, or seasons generally (a product of being born and raised in California), I freely admit that the one season I did grow to appreciate from my time in Boston was fall. I absolutely love how the trees change colors, and the leaves on the trees have finally changed into brilliant shades of orange, gold, and red. To be honest, it’s been hard not to take pictures 24/7.

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And while fall itself is a pretty exciting phenomenon, so are day trips! I’ve finally started to explore outside of Trondheim, and this past weekend I went to Røros with Alix and a friend of hers. Ø is still a sound that I have a bit of trouble with, but in case you’re wondering how to pronounce Røros it’s something along the lines of Ruh-ros.

Røros in one of Norway’s coldest towns, and in 2010 temperatures were recorded as going below -44°C (-47.2°F). Thankfully it wasn’t nearly that cold when I visited, although I will say that it was still very cold and very windy, even for October. Røros is also well known as a historic copper mining town. The smeltery was built here in 1646, and was closed for good when the Røros Copper Works went bankrupt in 1977, marking an end to a 333 year old business. Nowadays, Røros is more well known for housing a small artistic community and for having several museums dedicated to its mining history.

We decided to take a train to get to Røros, and after the requisite two hours of travel, our first stop in Røros was the church. Lucky for us, the church finished major renovations a few years ago so we were able to go inside and explore. The church was owned by the mining company until 1865, and it used to be that miners were required to attend church. The front of the church houses the pulpit as well as the oldest functional Norwegian built organ (made in 1742). The two flags by the alter are the flags of the mining company’s two military units, which were needed to defend the copper facilities against the Swedes. Overall, the church was fairly plain but worth the visit.

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After we stopped by the church, we headed to the smeltery museum. Unfortunately the museum was closed when we got there, but we still had a good time wandering around and admiring the old buildings.

IMG_4463  IMG_4458  IMG_4469We then decided to climb up the neighboring slag heaps, where we got beautiful views of the town and the neighboring miners’ cottages. While the view was well worth the climb, I will say that the top was incredibly windy. In fact, it was windy enough for all of us to lean over at an angle and be comfortably propped up by the wind.

After the slag heaps we spent the rest of our day eating in cafes and wandering into different artisan shops. Hopefully I’ll get the chance to visit the town again in February when they have their annual winter market, Rørosmartnan.

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2 thoughts on “Røros

  1. Pingback: Rørosmartnan | Wayward Travels

  2. Pingback: Trondheim Tips | Wayward Travels

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