Lessons

This week has been absolutely jam-packed so I’ve decided to break it up into a few different posts. This week I finally got in a full round of teaching for both of my NTNU classes, Academic Writing and Communication for Engineers. Academic Writing is a tiny class of about nine and it reminds me of my college seminars. Because the class is much smaller than Communication for Engineers (which has around 130 students) I’m much more of a co-teacher instead of a teaching assistant. We didn’t cover too much since it was the first class, but I’m looking forward to having a larger role as a teacher.

With Communication for Engineers, I got to teach the students a bit about writing resources. In case anyone is interested I covered:

1. Write or Die  (When you stop writing it starts to delete what you have written) 
2. Written kitten (It shows you a picture of a cat or the furry animal of your choice once you’ve written a certain number of words)
3. Omm Writer (Provides you with a nice clean interface for writing)
4. Final Deadline (Provides you with a host of resources that can help you with writing)

Shout outs to both my thesis advisor, Danny, and my sorority for showing me most of these. As expected, Write or Die and Written Kitten were by far the most popular of these resources. I also told the class that I would be happy to read over any of their writing and would be setting up regular office hours in case they wanted to meet with me one-on-one. One student has already sent over a draft of a literature review so I’m glad to see that the students aren’t afraid to take me up on my offer.

As for the classes that I’m taking, I’m currently enrolled in a Norwegian class and a class called Gender and Norwegian Culture. Unfortunately, I had to miss the Gender class due to the Fulbright Orientation (more on that later), but I did get to go to my first Norwegian class. While the teacher seems nice, the structure of the class is mind blowing to me. In the other languages that I’ve taken there have always been regular tests on vocabulary and grammar, and in the case of Korean, weekly one-on-one meetings with the teacher. In this class almost the entire grade is determined by the final. Other than that I only have to write six essays and attend at least 80% of the class. While I am supposed to do workbook exercises I do not have to turn them in and am expected to grade the exercises in my own time. In contrast with the American education system, which in my experience has required a lot of assignments, participation, and feedback, the Norwegian system seems to be pretty hands off. I’ve also noticed this with the other classes that I’m taking or teaching. There is not a lot of work or participation required, just a passing grade on the final.

On a brighter note, I have begun to tackle a few simple phrases and the Norwegian alphabet. Luckily the Norwegian alphabet is the same as the English alphabet but with three more vowels, ø, æ, å. While I still struggle to pronounce everything correctly I have managed to memorize the extra Norwegian vowels thanks to a funny YouTube video that another Fulbrighter showed me. I included the video below so hopefully you find it as funny as I did.

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